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Maitz Home Services

Tuesday, 11 April 2017 02:07

Why Isn't My Water Heater Hot Enough?

If your water heater is not getting hot enough or not staying hot for long, there are a number of possible causes.

1. The Dip Tube Is Broken
Cold water enters the water heater through the dip tube where it is forced to the bottom of the tank for quick heating. When the tube is broken the water remains at the top of the tank, where the hot water outlet is, causing it to return cold water with the heated water.

2. Sediment Has Built Up at the Bottom of the Tank
Over time, minerals in the water can build up at the bottom of the water heater tank where the burner is located. This causes a gradual reduction in heating efficiency that will make the water heater work harder and eventually resulting in less hot water. Flushing the tank annually will prevent sediment build up.

3. The Heating System Is Malfunctioning
Most water heater problems occur with these systems:
  • Thermal switch
  • Thermostat
  • Heating element
A licensed plumber should inspect the water heater and repair the pasts as needed.

4. Hot Water Heater Is Too Far From Where It's Needed

If the water eventually heats up, the problem is sometime a hot water tank that is too far from where it's needed. In the cold months in particular, pipes will cool the hot water before it reaches the faucet where it's needed. Insulating the pipes can help reduce heat loss.

5. The Water Heater Tank Is Undersized

If you have recently noticed that your water heater suddenly seems to supply less hot water, or runs out suddenly, it could be that your water heater tank is too small to keep up with demand. Installing a larger tank or tankless water heater will ensure that you have all the water your household needs.
If your noticing ice around your air conditioner's condenser coil, or the unit has stopped operating because of freezing, there are a few possible causes. 

1. Lack of air flow. An air conditioner works by taking the heat from inside the home and blowing it over the evaporator coil located outside the home. This split-system enables the heat exchange performed by the refrigerant to take place. Without the exchange of warm air the temperature of the coil will continue dropping, increasing the likelihood of a freeze up.

2. Low refrigerant levels. As the level of refrigerant drops, so does the pressure inside the system. When a smaller amount of refrigerant is forced to expand the same amount, it lowers the temperature.

3. Low outside temperature. If an air conditioner is run when the outside air is too cool, the pressure inside the unit can drop, causing a freeze up. This can occur at temperatures of around 62 degrees.

4. Malfunctioning mechanical systems. A damaged refrigerant line, broken fan, even a clogged up air filter, can cause the evaporator coil to freeze up.

Have air conditioner problems? Call Maitz Home Services, we can help diagnose the cause and offer solutions to fix the problem.
Tuesday, 21 March 2017 18:40

Help! My Air Conditioner Won't Turn On

It's the first hot day of the season and you go to turn on your air conditioner... and nothing happens. Before calling Maitz for service there are a few things you can check yourself.
  • First, check that the thermostat is set to "Cool" and not been unintentionally switched to the "Off" or "Heat" setting.
  • Turn the thermostat temperature down a few additional degrees to see if it turns on. 
  • Check that the external safety switch is set to the on position. The switch will be located on an exterior wall near the AC condensing unit.
  • Check that the circuit breaker that controls the air conditioner compressor and air handler are set to the “on” position. If a circuit breaker has tripped, reset the circuit breaker. If the circuit breaker trips again, do not try to reset it. Have Maitz check the unit to determine the cause of the problem.
If your air conditioner still won't turn on, call Maitz Home Services, we have fully stocked trucks in your you neighborhood with technicians who can quickly diagnose the problem and getting your air conditioner running again.
Tuesday, 14 March 2017 17:54

Preventing Sewer Line Damage

As a homeowner, you are responsible for maintaining your home's sewer line (also called the lateral) that runs from sewer main in the street that is owned by the city. By performing regular sewer line maintenance and fixing the small problems before they lead to major repairs like a backed-up sewer line, you can extend the life of the sewer line.

So what causes sewer line damage? The most common problem we see is tree root intrusion. Tree roots are drawn to the water and nutrients inside the pipe. If a sewer pipe develops even a small gap or crack, you can be sure that tree roots will find a way in where they will eventually obstruct the flow of waste and potentially break open a pipe joint.

There are several ways you can prevent sewer line problems.

1. Watch what you put down the drain. Never pour grease, paint or other thick liquids down the drain. Even if a product says it's "flushable", play it safe safe and throw it in the trash rather than flushing paper towels, disposable diapers, feminine hygiene products, q-tips and other items down the toilet.
2. Schedule a sewer line inspection. A video camera inspection can locate defects such as cracks, bad joints, leaks, as well as obstructions like tree roots.
3. Install a back flow valve. Many cities require that new homes have a back flow preventer installed to prevent wastewater from re-entering the house.
4. Keep the sewer line up to code. Never connect storm drain systems like french drains or sump pumps to your home's sanitary sewer system. It illegal in most cities and can allow mud to clog the sewer line.

Call Maitz today and schedule a sewer line camera inspection. You'll rest easier knowing your sewer system is working safely and reliably.
With spring weather just around the corner, now is a good time to schedule your annual air conditioner inspection and tune-up. Keeping your central air conditioner maintained will not only ensure that it runs reliably all season long, but will save you money. Even a small amount of dirt build-up can reduce efficiency, making your cooling system work harder to keep your home cool. This not only increases your utility bill and the likelihood of a breakdown, but can reduce the lifespan of your air conditioner. Here are some facts to consider:

“A dirty filter will slow down air flow and make the system work harder to keep you warm or cool – wasting energy and leading to expensive repairs and/or early system failure...A buildup of .042(1/20) inches of dirt on the heating or cooling coil can result in a decrease inefficiency of 21%.” – EnergyStar.gov

“1/8th of an inch of dirt and dust build-upon the blower wheel can reduce airflow by up to 30%”  – Texas A&M Study

In addition to keeping your air conditioner clean, a Maitz A/C tune-up includes lubricating moving parts, checking coolant levels, the blower motor, belts, electrical systems and much more. So call us today to schedule your AC tune up and rest assured that your cooling system is operating reliably and at peak efficiency all season long.


The EPA has been working to remove lead from drinking water for decades, yet it can still exist in trace amounts in municipal drinking water, or come from sources inside the home.

If your home was built prior to the 1980s, it's likely to have lead solder connecting the copper water pipes. Lead found in tap water often comes from corrosion of plumbing fixtures or the solder connecting the pipes. Today's plumbing fixtures must pass rigorous tests and be certified to contain levels of lead that are below safety thresholds.

Some major U.S. utilities use lead pipes to supply water from to homes and businesses. Because the pipes have been in use for a long time, they have formed a natural oxidation barrier that prevents lead from leeching into the water. Utilities will often add lime or orthophosphates as an additional barrier to prevent lead from getting into drinking water.

If you're concerned about lead in your home's drinking water, regular testing can help ensure that levels are safe to drink. In addition, EPA has an online guide called “How to Identify Lead Free Certification Marks for Drinking Water System & Plumbing Products” that can help you choose the right plumbing fixtures for your home.

 

Who's WhoAllentown, Pa, January 13, 2017: Who’s Who in Business, a consumer market research firm has announced that Maitz Home Services, a Lehigh Valley based Plumbing HVAC & Electrical company has been named as the winner in the Plumbing category for the top business in the Lehigh Valley for 2017. Who’s Who in Business contracts with an independent market research firm to conduct objective, unbiased surveys of Lehigh Valley residents to determine the market leader in each category.

Says Dave DeWalt, president of Maitz Home Services, “What started out in a barn on the east side of Allentown many years ago, has now grown into a regional business with 34 employees managing 10,000 service calls a year. I am proud of the accomplishments of my associates, and grateful to our customers that place their trust in us”

Maitz Home Services provides Plumbing, Heating, Air Conditioning, Electrical, and Water Treatment services to homeowners in the Lehigh Valley, Pocono’s, Berks, Bucks, and Montgomery Counties. They offer extended hours 7 days a week with no additional charges.

For more information contact Dave DeWalt, 610-797-8722 ext 311

Sunday, 19 March 2017 17:55

How To Drain Your Water Heater Tank

One way to extend the life of your water heater is to flush the tank annually to remove sediment buildup. Over time sediment can accumulate at the bottom of the tank, making heating less efficient and increasing the likelihood that corrosion will damage the tank. The process of flushing the tank is straightforward, here are the steps:

  1. Shut off the water supply - Locate the cold water supply valve at the top of the water heater and turn it to the off position.
  2. Turn off the water heater - If you have a gas water heater, simply turn the thermostat knob to the “pilot” setting. If the water heater is electric, turn off the power at the breaker panel.
  3. Attach a garden hose to the drain valve located near the bottom of the tank. Place the other end of the hose near a floor drain, in a bucket (have several large buckets to empty into and rotate them if needed) or outside the home. CAUTION: Even though a water heater may be off for hours, the water in the tank may still be hot enough to scald.
  4. Open a hot water tap - Open a hot water tap on a floor above that is nearest the water heater. This will relieve pressure in the system, helping the water drain from the tank.
  5. Open the drain valve - After all the water has drained from the tank, turn the cold water supply at the top of the tank back on for a moment. This will clear out any remaining sediment. Repeat this step until the water runs clear.

When you're finished draining the tank, return it to operating condition by following these steps:

  1. Close the drain valve
  2. Remove the hose
  3. Turn on the cold water supply to refill the tank. 
  4. Return to the hot water tap you opened earlier. Once cold water begins to flow from the tap, turn it off.
  5. Turn the gas valve back on from the pilot position or turn electricity back on to the tank.
  6. Check the valve opening to ensure it's not leaking.

IMPORTANT: Always read and follow all manufacturer’s directions and warnings for your particular water heater. Some water heater tanks must be completely full to avoid damage to the gas burner or heating elements.

Need assistance maintaining your water heater? Call Maitz Home Services, we can help.

Appliances that use natural gas for fuel, like your furnace, water heater or clothes dryer, rely on combustion to create heat. These appliances have traditionally utilized atmospheric combustion, or from air drawn inside the home, often from the basement. The combustion exhaust gases are then vented out of the flue or chimney. With sealed combustion appliances the supply and return air flow is tightly contained, so it does not have to rely on the air inside the home to convert fuel into heat.

The Advantages of Sealed Combustion

The main advantage of sealed combustion is improved efficiency. To achieve an Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency (AFUE) of 90 or higher, furnaces utilize sealed combustion. With sealed combustion, the furnace connects to the outdoor air through a supply and a return pipe. Because the air supplied to the furnace is outdoor air, and the flue gases are exhausted back outside furnace efficiency is increased because it is not heating air only to vent it outside.

Another advantage of sealed combustion is safety. Without an exposed flame, there is no risk of flammable materials near the appliance catching fire. Burning natural gas can also generate dangerous carbon monoxide (CO) gas, which is more likely to enter the home through backdraft in an sealed combustion chamber. 

Sunday, 19 March 2017 17:55

Water Heater Inspection Checklist

When it comes to preventing plumbing problems around the home, being aware of the early warning signs can make the difference between a major repair and damage to your home, or a simple do-it-yourself fix.

When inspecting a water heater, look for the following:
  1. Is the hot water heater consistently producing hot water? Sudden drops in hot water supply could signal a problem with the burner, or a build up of sediment in the tank. 
  2. Check for unusual sounds. Gurgling sounds coming from a hot water heater are often a sign that sediment has built up at the bottom of the tank. Flushing the tank regularly can prevent sediment build up. 
  3. Are there burn marks at the base of the water heater? This is often a symptom of back drafting. Because this is a safety issue, have the water heater inspected by a professional plumber. 
  4. Check for proper ventilation. Ensure the draft hood is securely connected. The flu should be properly connected using a minimum of three screws per joint. Flues that are run into a chimney should be properly lined and connected to prevent carbon monoxide from re-entering the home. 
  5. Is there a drain pan under the water heater? If the tank is on an upper level of the home, a drain pan will ensure that water leaks do not cause damage to the floor and ceiling below. 
  6. Ensure a drip pipe is in place and is not leaking. The T&P or pressure relief valve should have a pipe that extends 6 inches from the floor. 
  7. Keep combustable materials away from the water heater. 
Need help with your water heater? Call Maitz Home Services anytime.


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